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Videos uploaded by user “Deep Look” for the 2019
These Face Mites Really Grow on You | Deep Look
 
03:28
Yep, you probably have Demodex mites living on your face. These tiny arachnids feast on sebum, the greasy oil in your pores. But should you be worried about your eight-legged guests? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Pretty much every adult human alive has a population of these mites living on them. Also called eyelash mites, they’re too small to see with the naked eye. They’re mostly transparent, and at about .3 millimeters long, it would take about five face adult mites laid end to end to stretch across the head of a pin. Face mites spend their days face-down inside your hair follicles nestled up against the hair shaft. They eat sebum, that greasy oil your skin makes to protect itself and keep it from drying out. That’s why the greasiest parts of your body — like around the eyes, nose and mouth — likely harbor a higher concentration of mites than other areas. They live about two weeks. They spend most of their time tucked inside our pores. But while we’re sleeping, they crawl out onto the surface of our skin to mate before crawling back into our pores to lay their eggs. Fun! --- How common are face mites? Pretty much everyone has some face mites on them. Babies are born without them but quickly receive them from their parents through direct contact. The amount of mites may increase during puberty when the skin starts to produce more oil. --- How do you get rid of face mites? There’s usually no need to try to rid yourself of face mites as they typically don’t cause any symptoms and are nearly impossible to fully eradicate. Since female face mites can also reproduce asexually, it only takes one mite to repopulate your skin. Some people experience an overpopulation of face mites resulting in an inflammatory disease called demodicosis which is easy to recognize sue to the many small evenly-sized pimples that appear quickly. Consult a dermatologist if you think you may have symptoms. --- What do face mites eat? Face mites consume the greasy oil that you skin produces to protect itself. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED https://www.kqed.org/science/1941506/these-face-mites-really-grow-on-you ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&t=1s How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IoOJu2_FKE ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to jac lyn, Vanessa C u later, aspireme_95, Émile Julien, and Nono Chan who correctly identified the part of this animal that is, well… missing. Demodex lack an anus! Se the Community Tab post here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwjkBkGKXBPBVHEJRh4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Ahegao Comics, Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carlos Zepeda, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Companion Cube, Cooper Caraway, Daisuke Goto, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Elizabeth Wolden, Ivan Alexander, Iver Soto, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jenn's Bowtique, Jeremy Lambert, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Karen Reynolds, Kristell Esquivel , KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Lyall Talarico, Mario Rahmani, Marjorie D Miller, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Monica Albe, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, SueEllen McCann, Tatianna Bartlett, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Tommy Tran, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #facemites #demodex #deeplook
Views: 1428940 Deep Look
This Millipede and Beetle Have a Toxic Relationship | Deep Look
 
04:33
This millipede uses deadly cyanide gas to keep predators at bay. But one beetle can tolerate the toxic defense and rides the millipede like a bucking bronco. Who will win this showdown in the forest? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Across Northern California, as the rainy season is ending and spring is taking hold, bees are buzzing, flowers are growing and hikers are hitting the trails. But down at ground level, the pastoral scenery is concealing a surprising battle: relentless chemical warfare between bugs. More than 200 species of millipedes emerge from their underground lairs every year during the winter and early spring months to forage for food and seek mates. They have to fend off insects, mammals, reptiles and amphibians looking for a tasty meal. But they have a secret weapon – toxic chemicals they shoot from special glands. One Bay Area species, Xystocheir dissecta, carries deadly cyanide and benzaldehyde. If they’re feeling threatened, these millipedes produce an invisible, odorless hydrogen cyanide gas that they spray at predators, and which is virtually toxic to all organisms. One byproduct is benzaldehyde, which gives off the scent of bitter almonds, as an additional signal that they’re secreting poison. The millipedes don’t poison themselves, however. They’ve developed an immunity. The cyanide can kill nearly any other animal trying to dine on the millipedes. Except one. New research has found that one tough beetle is the only known predator in the world that can survive a direct blast of cyanide gas and keep going. Brandt Weary, an entomologist, studied these hardy beetles last year for his senior thesis at the University of California Berkeley. The beetles, known as Promecognathus crassus, love to eat millipedes, even though they are only one-fifth the millipedes’ size. Weary wanted to know more about how the beetles withstood the millipedes’ tough chemical defense. He found that while many other beetles will avoid the cyanide-spraying millipedes, Promecognathus seeks them out. --- How many legs do millipedes have? Most millipedes have between 34-400 legs, and the record is 750! --- Why do these millipedes “glow” or fluoresce? One theory behind millipede fluorescence is that it's a warning sign. Moonlight has some UV light, so maybe an animal with better night vision can see the fluorescence even if we can't. --- Which millipedes produce cyanide? Only millipedes in the order Polydesmida produce cyanide. It's the largest order of millipedes with about 3500 species. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1939811/this-millipede-and-beetle-have-a-toxic-relationship ---+ For more information: Kip Will at UC Berkeley: https://ourenvironment.berkeley.edu/people/kipling-will Science on the SPOT: Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz: https://ww2.kqed.org/quest/2013/03/19/science-on-the-spot-the-glowing-millipedes-of-alcatraz/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to these fans for suggesting our *5 favorite common names* for Xystocheir dissecta, on our Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugwt2DsvG4dbBa5HPSF4AaABCQ #5 Unom Auhasard: Walking rave stick #4 F E: "Lumilipede" #3 Mr.salty: " hell no" #2 Mystery Bomb Noel: "blue galaxy" #1 Tinkili: "Glowy Feets McGee" ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Jeremy Lambert, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Bugeyed.fr, WhatzGames, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Robert Warner, Shirley Washburn, Tatianna Bartlett, KW, Tanya Finch, Elizabeth Wolden, Sayantan Dasgupta, Monica Albe, Willy Nursalim, Jenn's Bowtique, Jane Orbuch, Laurel Przybylski, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jason Buberel, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Jeanine Womble, Aurora Mitchell, Edwin Rivas, Marjorie D Miller, Companion Cube, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Two Box Fish, PM Daeley, TierZoo, Robert Amling, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Mario Rahmani ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #millipede #beetle #deeplook
Views: 695071 Deep Look
Meeting a Wormlion Is the Pits | Deep Look
 
04:14
Straight out of science fiction, the fearsome wormlion ambushes prey at the bottom of a tidy - and terrifying - sand pit, then flicks their carcasses out. These meals fuel its transformation into something unexpected. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Ominous creatures that lurk deep underground in the desert, like the sandworms in the classic science fiction novel "Dune," aren’t just make-believe. For ants and other prey, wormlions are a terrifying reality. While quite small—they can grow up to an inch—wormlions are fly larvae that curl up their bodies like slingshots. Usually found under rock or log overhangs in dry, sandy landscapes, they’ll energetically fling soil, sand and pebbles out of the way to dig pit traps. Once an unlucky critter falls in, wormlions move at lightning speed and quickly wrap their bodies around their victims. Squeezing them like boa constrictors, they also inject them with a paralyzing venom. They feed this way for several years, until they transform into adults. Joyce Gross, a computer programmer for the UC Berkeley Natural History Museums, is fascinated by their unique hunting behavior. “They have such a weird life history," she said. "They're the only flies that dig pits like this, and wait for prey to fall in, just like antlions.” ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1941850/meeting-a-wormlion-is-the-pits --- Are antlions and wormlions related? While they use a similar hunting technique with pitfall traps, they’re actually two separate species. --- How are antlions and wormlions different from each other? Antlions have big jaws, while wormlions have tiny mouthparts typical of other flies. They also dig pits differently. Antlions (genus Myrmeleon) create deeper pits by digging backwards in a spiral-shaped path. ---+ For more information: Read "Demons of the Dust" (1930) by William Morton Wheeler: https://books.google.com/books/about/Demons_of_the_dust.html?id=hrvPAAAAMAAJ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Creepy Crawly Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBYF3x2RYLhPH0-tP_u2nRX ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly identifying the creature's genus in our community tab challenge: Gar Báge, Phil Conti, Pikaia Battaile, Trinidadmax, and BorderLander . ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! ThePeaceOfBread, Jeremy Gutierrez, Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Tea Torvinen, m_drunk, David Deshpande, Noah Hess, Daisuke Goto, Companion Cube, WhatzGames, Edwin, ThePeaceOfBread, Richard Shalumov, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, pearsryummy, Samuel Bean, Shirley Washburn, Kristell Esquivel , Jiayang Li, Jeremy Gutierrez, Carlos Zepeda, KW, johanna reis, Robert Warner, Monica Albe, Elizabeth Wolden, Cindy McGill, Sayantan Dasgupta, Robert Amling, Kilillith, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Pamela Parker, Kendall Rasmussen, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Kenia Villegas, Breanna Tarnawsky, Sonia Tanlimco, Bluapex, Ivan Alexander, Allen, Michele Wong, Johnnyonnyful, Tommy Tran, Rick Wong, Dean Skoglund, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Beckie, Jane Orbuch, Nathan Wright, Nathan Padilla, Jason Buberel, Sean Tucker, Carl, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Titania Juang, Daniel Voisine, Michael Mieczkowski, Kyle Fisher, Kirtan Patel, Jeanine Womble, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Kallie Moore, SueEllen McCann, Jeanne Sommer, Edwin Rivas, Geidi Rodriguez, Benjamin Ip, Willy Nursalim, Katherine Schick, Aurora Mitchell, Two Box Fish, Daisy Trevino , Ricardo Martinez, Marjorie D Miller, Ben Espey, Cory, Eric Carter, PM Daeley, Ahegao Comics, Iver Soto, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Nicolette Ray, Yvan Mostaza, TierZoo, Gerzon ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #wormlion #insect #deeplook
Views: 537987 Deep Look
Samurai Wasps Say 'Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs' | Deep Look
 
04:23
Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Yep, brown marmorated stink bugs are stinky, but that’s not the worst thing about them. They're imported agricultural pests eating their way across North America. But a native enemy from Asia – the tiny samurai wasp – has a particularly nasty method of stopping stink bugs in their tracks. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- It looks rather harmless at first glance. With a speckled exterior and a shield-like shape, the brown marmorated stink bug doesn’t appear to be any different from any other six-legged insect that might pop up in your garden. But this particular bug, which arrived in the U.S. from Asia in the mid-1990s and smells like old socks when it is squashed, is a real nuisance. Not only can it invade homes by the thousands in the wintertime, it’s one formidable agricultural pest, eating millions of dollars of peaches, apples and other crops since 2010. Scientists are now investigating a new tactic in the war on the stink bugs: the possibility of relying on one of the bug’s natural enemies, the samurai wasp. Also native to Asia, this parasitic wasp keeps the stink bug population in check there. How? ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1937639/samurai-wasps-say-smell-ya-later-stink-bugs ---+ For more information: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Research at Oregon State University http://bit.ly/2GB8RFs ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: These Hairworms Eat a Cricket Alive and Control Its Mind https://youtu.be/YB6O7jS_VBM Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers https://youtu.be/mHbwC-AIyTE Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers https://youtu.be/9bEjYunwByw ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to bujur10514, Ace _YT13, Iridescent Moonbeam, Salina Tran, and Noke Noke over at the Deep Look Community Tab, for correctly identifying the term 'Thigmotaxis:' https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwzgP-aDFmzCVObZZN4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Karen Reynolds, Yidan Sun, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, KW, Shirley Washburn, Tanya Finch, johanna reis, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jeanine Womble, Michael Mieczkowski, SueEllen McCann, TierZoo, James Tarraga, Willy Nursalim, Aurora Mitchell, Marjorie D Miller, Joao Ascensao, PM Daeley, Two Box Fish, Tatianna Bartlett, Monica Albe, Jason Buberel ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #stinkbugs #wildlife
Views: 574832 Deep Look
Porcupines Give You 30,000 Reasons to Back Off | Deep Look
 
04:21
Porcupines may be adorable, but their quills are razor-sharp, designed to impale and next to impossible to remove. But it's not all bad news. Researchers are designing new surgical staples that mimic the quill's shape to better close wounds and promote healing. Check our PBS Sound Field! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvMLMyKPomE6kTTL9Kv8Iww Meet Seth Samuel, Deep Look Composer! https://www.patreon.com/posts/25828498 SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. The quills of North American porcupines have microscopic backward-facing barbs on the tips. Those barbs make the quills slide in easy but very difficult to remove. Researchers at Harvard are looking to porcupine quills for inspiration in designing a new type of surgical staple that would also use tiny barbs to keep itself lodged into the patient’s skin. This helps because traditional staples curve in under the skin to keep the staple in place. This creates more damage and can provide a place for bacteria to infect the wound. --- How do porcupines defend themselves? If threatened, a porcupine will bristle, raising its quills. The quills are densest in an area on the porcupine's back called the rosette. The quills are coated in a grease secreted by the porcupine’s skin. When the porcupine exposes its quills it releases a musky odor unique to porcupines that serves as a warning. The porcupine turns so that it’s head faces away from the attacker and chatters its teeth to make an audible warning. If that’s not enough, he porcupine will use its muscular tail, covered in quills, to slap their attacker if they get too close. --- Do porcupines shoot their quills? Porcupines do not shoot their quills out. That’s a myth. Porcupine quills are held by their skin in a way that makes them difficult to fall out unless pushed in first, usually by contact with an attacker. The tail moves so quickly that it can appear that it is shooting the quills out. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/04/09/porcupines-give-you-30,000-reasons-to-back-off/ ---+ For more information: Professor Uldis Roze studies North American porcupines at Queens College at the City University of New York: http://biology.qc.cuny.edu/people/faculty/dr-uldis-roze/ Dr. Jeff Karp is developing a new type of surgical staple inspired by the barbs on North American porcupine quills. http://www.karplab.net/portfolio-item/porcupine-inspired-needles ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBpNSC7BIONruffF_ab4cqK&index=47 Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-0SFWPLaII&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBpNSC7BIONruffF_ab4cqK&index=19 ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆Snowcube94, Marley Kang, Mr Spooks, David Bouslov, and NonEuclideanDreams🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the muscle (arrector pili) and a scientific name for the phenomenon known as goose bumps (piloerection, horripilation, or cutis anserina), over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugyape2VJb97x8bM77B4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Jeremy Lambert, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Bugeyed.fr, WhatzGames, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Robert Warner, Shirley Washburn, Tatianna Bartlett, KW, Tanya Finch, Elizabeth Wolden, Sayantan Dasgupta, Monica Albe, Willy Nursalim, Jenn's Bowtique, Jane Orbuch, Laurel Przybylski, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jason Buberel, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Jeanine Womble, Aurora Mitchell, Edwin Rivas, Marjorie D Miller, Companion Cube, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Two Box Fish, PM Daeley, TierZoo, Robert Amling, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Mario Rahmani ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
Views: 593514 Deep Look
These Hairworms Eat a Cricket Alive and Control Its Mind | Deep Look
 
04:36
Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook A baby hairworm hitches a ride inside a cricket, feasting on its fat until the coiled-up parasite is ready to burst out. Then it hijacks the cricket's mind and compels it to head to water for a gruesome little swim. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. If you’re out on a hike and look down at a puddle, you might spot a long, brown spaghetti-shaped creature whipping around madly in a figure 8. It’s a hairworm – also known as a horsehair worm or Gordian worm – and researchers have described 350 species around the world. Good news: It isn’t interested in infecting or attacking humans. But if you had happened on the puddle a few hours earlier, you might have witnessed a gruesome spectacle – the hairworm wriggling out of a cricket’s body, pushing its way out like the baby monster in the movie “Alien.” How a hairworm ends up in a puddle, or another water source such as a stream, hot tub or a pet’s water dish, is a complex story. A young hairworm finds its way into a cricket or similar insect like a beetle or grasshopper, and once it’s grown into an adult, the parasite takes over its host’s brain to hitch a ride to the water. As a result of the infection, crickets stop growing and reproducing. Male crickets infected by hairworms even lose their chirp, said Ben Hanelt, a biologist at the University of New Mexico who studies hairworms. --- What *is* a hair worm? A hair worm or hairworm – pick your spelling – is a nematomorph. Nematomorpha are a group of parasites. They’re long, thin worms that can grow to be several meters long inside their host. --- Can humans be infected by hair worms? There are reports of humans and cats and dogs being infected by hair worms, but hair worms aren’t after us or our pets because they can’t grow inside us, said Hanelt. They can only grow inside a host like a cricket or a related insect. “What happens is that a dog, a cat, a human will ingest an adult (hair worm) somehow,” said Hanelt. “Could a cricket crawl in your sandwich before you take a bite? I don’t know. None of the studies that are out there talk about that. What they have been reported to do is to cause in many people intestinal distress.” --- How do hair worms control crickets’ minds? Scientists don’t understand the precise mechanism yet, but they believe that hairworms either boost chemicals in the crickets’ brains or pump chemicals into their brains. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1937775/these-hairworms-eat-a-cricket-alive-and-control-its-mind ---+ For more information: Hairworm Biodiversity Survey: http://www.nematomorpha.net ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHbwC-AIyTE How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU Identical Snowflakes? Scientist Ruins Winter For Everyone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gojddrb70N8 ---+ Follow KQED Science: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Sushant Mendon who won our GIF CHALLENGE over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/user/KQEDDeepLook/community ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #hairworms #wildlife
Views: 5330203 Deep Look
How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look
 
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Why are itchy lice so tough to get rid of and how do they spread like wildfire? They have huge claws that hook on hair perfectly, as they crawl quickly from head to head. JOIN our Deep Look community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Head lice can only move by crawling on hair. They glue their eggs to individual strands, nice and close to the scalp, where the heat helps them hatch. They feed on blood several times a day. And even though head lice can spread by laying their eggs in sports helmets and baseball caps, the main way they get around is by simply crawling from one head to another using scythe-shaped claws. These claws, which are big relative to a louse’s body, work in unison with a small spiky thumb-like part called a spine. With the claw and spine at the end of each of its six legs, a louse grasps a hair strand to hold on, or quickly crawl from hair to hair like a speedy acrobat. Their drive to stay on a human head is strong because once they’re off and lose access to their blood meals, they starve and die within 15 to 24 hours. --- How do you kill lice? Researchers found in 2016 that lice in the U.S. have become resistant to over-the-counter insecticide shampoos, which contain natural insecticides called pyrethrins, and their synthetic version, known as pyrethroids. Other products do still work against lice, though. Prescription treatments that contain the insecticides ivermectin and spinosad are effective, said entomologist John Clark, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. They’re prescribed to kill both lice and their eggs. Clark said treatments such as suffocants, which block the lice’s breathing holes, and hot-air devices that dry them up, also work. He added that tea tree oil works both as a repellent and a “pretty good” insecticide. Combing lice and eggs out with a special metal comb is also a recommended treatment. --- How long do lice survive? It takes six to nine days for their eggs to hatch and about as long for the young lice to grow up and start laying their own eggs. Adult lice can live on a person’s head for up to 30 days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). --- Can your pet give you lice? No. Human head lice only live on our heads. They can’t really move to other parts of our body or onto pets. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1939435/how-lice-turn-your-hair-into-their-jungle-gym ---+ For more information: Visit the CDC’s page on head lice: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/index.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IoOJu2_FKE ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆HaileyBubs, Tiffany Haner, cjovani78z, יואבי אייל, and Bellybutton King🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the species and subspecies of insect in this episode over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugwl_PstCaUYdfgvfa54AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Karen Reynolds, Yidan Sun, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, KW, Shirley Washburn, Tanya Finch, johanna reis, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jeanine Womble, Michael Mieczkowski, TierZoo, James Tarraga, Willy Nursalim, Aurora Mitchell, Marjorie D Miller, Joao Ascensao, PM Daeley, Two Box Fish, Tatianna Bartlett, Monica Albe, Jason Buberel ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
Views: 4053708 Deep Look
Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers | Deep Look
 
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There are strange little towers on the forest floor. Neat, right? Nope. Inside hides a spider that's cunning, patient and ruthless. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please follow us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Most Bay Area hikers pass right by without ever noticing, but a careful eye can spot tiny towers rising up from the forest floor. These mysterious little tubes, barely an inch high, are the homes of a particularly sneaky predator -- the California turret spider. “To me, the turrets look just like the rook in a chess set,” said Trent Pearce, a naturalist for the East Bay Regional Park District, as he scanned the terrain at Briones Regional Park. “The spiders themselves are super burly – like a tiny tarantula the size of your pinky nail.” Turret spiders build their towers along creek beds and under fallen trees in forested areas throughout Central and Northern California. They use whatever mud, moss, bark and leaves they can find nearby, making their turrets extremely well camouflaged. They line the inside of their tiny castles with pearly white silk, which makes the structure supple and resilient Each turret leads down to a burrow that can extend six inches underground. The spiders spend their days down there in the dark, protected from the sun and predators. As night falls, they climb up to the entrance of the turrets to wait for unsuspecting prey like beetles to happen by. Turret spiders are ambush hunters. While remaining hidden inside their turret, they’re able to sense the vibrations created by their prey’s footsteps. That’s when the turret spider strikes, busting out of the hollow tower like an eight legged jack-in-the-box. With lightning speed the spider swings its fangs down like daggers, injecting venom into its prey before dragging it down into the burrow. “It’s like the scene in a horror movie where the monster appears out of nowhere – you can’t not jump,” Pearce said. --- What do turret spiders eat? Turret spiders mostly ground-dwelling arthropods like beetles but they will also attack flying insects like moths that happen to land near their turrets. --- Are turret spiders dangerous to people? Turret spiders are nocturnal so it’s rare for them to interact with humans by accident. They tend to retreat into their underground burrow if they feel the vibrations of human footsteps. They do have fangs and venom but are not generally considered to be dangerous compared to other spiders. If you leave them alone, you shouldn’t have anything to fear from turret spiders. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/01/15/turret-spiders-launch-sneak-attacks-from-tiny-towers/ ---+ For more information: Learn to Look for Them, and California’s Unique “Turret Spiders” are Everywhere https://baynature.org/article/and-this-little-spider-stayed-home/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: For These Tiny Spiders, It's Sing or Get Served | Deep Look https://youtu.be/y7qMqAgCqME Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look https://youtu.be/EHo_9wnnUTE Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look https://youtu.be/NpJNeGqExrc ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆Iset4, MidKnight Fall7, jon pomeroy, Justin Felder3, and DrowsyTaurus26🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the species of spider in our episode - Antrodiaetus riversi (also known as Atypoides riversi) over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxFKwljdtKxxD-xY6V4AaABCQ (hat tip to Edison Lewis10 for posting the entire family tree!) ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #spiders #wildlife
Views: 1010723 Deep Look
Honey Bees Make Honey ... and Bread? | Deep Look
 
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Honey bees make honey from nectar to fuel their flight – and our sweet tooth. But they also need pollen for protein. So they trap, brush and pack it into baskets on their legs to make a special food called bee bread. JOIN our Deep Look community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Spring means honey bees flitting from flower to flower. This frantic insect activity is essential to growing foods like almonds, raspberries and apples. Bees move pollen, making it possible for plants to grow the fruit and seeds they need to reproduce. But honey bees don’t just move pollen from plant to plant. They also keep a lot for themselves. They carry it around in neat little balls, one on each of their hind legs. Collecting, packing and making pollen into something they can eat is a tough, intricate job that’s essential to the colony’s well-being. Older female adult bees collect pollen and mix it with nectar or honey as they go along, then carry it back to the hive and deposit it in cells next to the developing baby bees, called larvae. This stored pollen, known as bee bread, is the colony’s main source of protein. “You don’t have bees flying along snacking on pollen as they’re collecting it,” said Mark Carroll, an entomologist at the US Department of Agriculture’s Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson. “This is the form of pollen that bees are eating.” --- What is bee bread? It’s the pollen that worker honey bees have collected, mixed with a little nectar or honey and stored within cells in the hive. --- What is bee bread used for? Bee bread is the main source of protein for adult bees and larvae. Young adult bees eat bee bread to make a liquid food similar to mammal’s milk that they feed to growing larvae; they also feed little bits of bee bread to older larvae. --- How do honey bees use their pollen basket? When a bee lands on a flower, it nibbles and licks off the pollen, which sticks to its head. It wipes the pollen off its eyes and antennae with a brush on each of its front legs, using them in tandem like windshield wipers. It also cleans the pollen off its mouth part, and as it does this, it mixes it with some saliva and a little nectar or honey that it carries around in a kind of stomach called a crop. Then the bee uses brushes on its front, middle and hind legs to move the pollen, conveyor-belt style, front to middle to back. As it flies from bloom to bloom, the bee combs the pollen very quickly and moves it into baskets on its hind legs. Each pollen basket, called a corbicula, is a concave section of the hind leg covered by longish hairs that bend over and around the pollen. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1940898/honey-bees-make-honey-and-bread ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to spqr0a, A D2, James Peirce, Armageddonchampion, and Даниил Мерзликин for identifying what our worker bee was putting in a honeycomb cell (and why) - Bee Bread! See more on our Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgygsE43ghZvdVIcn0V4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Ahegao Comics, Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carlos Zepeda, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Companion Cube, Cooper Caraway, Daisuke Goto, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Elizabeth Wolden, Ivan Alexander, Iver Soto, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jenn's Bowtique, Jeremy Lambert, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Karen Reynolds, Kristell Esquivel , KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Lyall Talarico, Mario Rahmani, Marjorie D Miller, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Monica Albe, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, SueEllen McCann, Tatianna Bartlett, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Tommy Tran, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #honeybees #bee bread #deeplook
Views: 774184 Deep Look
Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers | Deep Look
 
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With their big heads and beady black eyes, Jerusalem crickets aren't winning any beauty contests. But that doesn't stop them from finding mates. They use their bulbous bellies to serenade each other with some furious drumming. Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Come join us on our Deep Look Communty Tab: https://www.youtube.com/user/KQEDDeepLook/community -- DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Potato Bug. Child of the Earth. Old Bald-Headed Man. Skull Insects. Devil’s Baby. Spawn of Satan. There’s a fairly long list of imaginative nicknames that refer to Jerusalem crickets, those six-legged insects with eerily humanlike faces and prominent striped abdomens. And they can get quite large, too: Some measure over 3 inches long and weigh more than a mouse, so they can be quite unnerving if you see them crawling around in your backyard in summertime. One individual who finds them compelling, and not creepy, has been studying Jerusalem crickets for over 40 years: David Weissman, a research associate in entomology affiliated with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. He’s now considered the world’s foremost expert, since no one else has been as captivated or singlemindedly devoted to learning more about them. While much of their general behavior is still not widely understood, Jerusalem crickets typically live solitary lives underground. They’ll emerge at night to scavenge for roots, tubers and smaller insects for their meals. And it’s also when they come out to serenade potential partners with a musical ritual: To attract a mate, adult crickets use their abdomens to drum the ground and generate low-frequency sound waves. If a male begins drumming and a female senses the vibrations, she’ll respond with a longer drumming sequence so that he’ll have enough time to track her down. The drumming can vary between one beat every other second up to 40 beats per second. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1932923/jerusalem-crickets-only-date-drummers ---+ For more information: JERUSALEM! CRICKET? (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus); Origins of a Common Name https://goo.gl/Y49GAK ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The House Centipede is Fast, Furious, and Just So Extra | Deep Look https://youtu.be/q2RtbP1d7Kg Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look https://youtu.be/sj8pFX9SOXE Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers | Deep Look https://youtu.be/9bEjYunwByw ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Piss Dog, Trent Geer, Mario Stankovski, Jelani Shillingford, and Chaddydaddy who were the first to correctly 3 the species of Jerusalem Cricket relatives of the Stenopelmatoidea superfamily in our episode, over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxEuwVr4FmBNg-wtCJ4AaABCQ (hat tip to Antonio Garcia, who shared 3 full species names) ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #jerusalemcrickets #wildlife
Views: 906858 Deep Look
How Your Dog's Nose Knows So Much | Deep Look
 
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Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Dogs have a famously great sense of smell, but what makes their noses so much more powerful than ours? They're packing some sophisticated equipment inside that squishy schnozz. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- How much more powerful is a dog’s sense of smell compared to a human? According to one estimate, dogs are 10,000-100,000 times more sensitive to smell than humans. They have about 15 times more olfactory neurons that send signals about odors to the brain. The neurons in a dog’s nose are spread out over a much larger and more convoluted area allowing them more easily decipher specific chemicals in the air. --- Why are dog noses wet? Dog noses secrete mucus which traps odors in the air and on the ground. When a dog licks its nose, the tongue brings those odors into the mouth allowing it to sample those smells. Dogs mostly cool themselves by panting but the mucus on their noses and sweat from their paws cool through evaporation. --- Why do dog nostrils have slits on the side? Dogs sniff about five times per second. The slits on the sides allows exhaled air to vent towards the sides and back. That air moving towards the back of the dog creates a low air pressure region in front of it. Air from in front of the dog rushes in to fill that low pressure region. That allows the nose to actively bring odors in from in front and keeps the exhaled air from contaminating new samples. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/02/26/how-your-dogs-nose-knows-so-much/ ---+ For more information: The Odor Navigation Project funded NSF Brain Initiative https://odornavigation.org/ Jacobs Lab of Cognitive Biology at UC Berkeley http://jacobs.berkeley.edu/ Ecological Fluid Dynamics Lab at University of Colorado Boulder https://www.colorado.edu/lab/ecological-fluids/ The fluid dynamics of canine olfaction: unique nasal airflow patterns as an explanation of macrosmia (Brent A. Craven, Eric G. Paterson, and Gary S. Settles) https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsif.2009.0490 ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zxqg_um1TXI You've Heard of a Murder of Crows. How About a Crow Funeral? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixYVFZnNl6s&t=85s Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism! | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m37QR_4XNY What Makes Owls So Quiet and So Deadly? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a68fIQzaDBY ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! How James Brown Invented Funk | Sound Field https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AihgZv1D5-4 How To Suck Carbon Dioxide Out of the Sky | Hot Mess https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKtXojkwlK8 What’s the Real Cost of Owning A Pet? | Two Cents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ma3Mt5BPlTE ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Branden W., Edison Lewis, Vampire Wolf, Haithem Ghanem and Droidtigger who won our GIF CHALLENGE over at the Deep Look Community Tab, by identifying the special region in the canine skull which houses much of the smell ability: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxG3acWQLcpjNUTlXt4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month) Bill Cass Justin Bull Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Karen Reynolds Yidan Sun Elizabeth Ann Ditz KW Shirley Washburn Tanya Finch johanna reis Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Johnnyonnyful Levi Cai Jeanine Womble Michael Mieczkowski SueEllen McCann TierZoo James Tarraga Willy Nursalim Aurora Mitchell Marjorie D Miller Joao Ascensao PM Daeley Two Box Fish Tatianna Bartlett Monica Albe Jason Buberel ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
Views: 299262 Deep Look
Watch Bed Bugs Get Stopped in Their Tracks | Deep Look
 
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At night, these parasites crawl onto your bed, bite you and suck your blood. Then they find a nearby hideout where they leave disgusting telltale signs. But these pests have an Achilles’ heel that stops them cold. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Adult bed bugs are about the size and color of an apple seed. After biting, they hide in a nearby cranny, like the seam of the mattress. At the University of California, Irvine, biologist and engineer Catherine Loudon is working to create synthetic surfaces that could trap bed bugs. She was inspired by the tiny hooked hairs that grow from the leaves of some varieties of beans, such as kidney and green beans. In nature, these hairs, called trichomes, pierce through the feet of the aphids and leafhoppers that like to feed on the plants. Researchers have found that these pointy hairs are just as effective against bed bugs, even though the bloodsucking parasites don’t feed on leaves. Loudon’s goal is to mimic a bean leaf’s mechanism to create an inexpensive, portable bed bug trap. “You could imagine a strip that would act as a barrier that could be placed virtually anywhere: across the portal to a room, behind the headboard, on subway seats, an airplane,” Loudon said. “They have six legs, so that’s six opportunities to get trapped.” --- Where do bed bugs come from? Bed bugs don’t fly or jump or come in from the garden. They crawl very quickly and hide in travelers’ luggage. They also move around on secondhand furniture, or from apartment to apartment. --- How can I avoid bringing bed bugs home? “It would probably be a prudent thing to do a quick bed check if you’re sleeping in a strange bed,” said Potter. His recommendation goes for hotel rooms, as well as dorms and summer camp bunk beds. He suggests pulling back the sheet at the head of the bed and checking the seams on the top and bottom of the mattress and the box spring. ---+ For more tips, read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1944245/watch-bed-bugs-get-stopped-in-their-tracks ---+ More Great Deep Look Episodes: ‘Parasites are Dynamite’ Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQACmrtvWX7hr7X7Zv8F4nEi ---+ 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly identifying the creature's species name in our community tab challenge: Stay in Your Layne Brian Lee Brad Denney Elise Wade Raminta’s Photography https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugz37Tnkfr8gOF7tRL54AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Bluapex, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carl, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Cindy McGill, Companion Cube, Cory, Daisuke Goto, Daisy Trevino , Daniel Voisine, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Dean Skoglund, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Eric Carter, Geidi Rodriguez, Gerardo Alfaro, Ivan Alexander, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jeanne Sommer, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Kallie Moore, Karen Reynolds, Katherine Schick, Kendall Rasmussen, Kenia Villegas, Kristell Esquivel, KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Michele Wong, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Nicolette Ray, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, riceeater, Richard Shalumov, Rick Wong, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Samuel Bean, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, Sonia Tanlimco, SueEllen McCann, Supernovabetty, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Titania Juang, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim, Yvan Mostaza, ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #bedbug #bedbugtrap #bedbugbite
Views: 646832 Deep Look