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Videos uploaded by user “FuseSchool - Global Education”
What Is Eutrophication | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
01:55
What happens when fertilisers get washed into lakes and rivers? A process called eutrophication. Learn all about it in this video. 00:00:00,720 -- 00:00:02,720 Eutrophication is the process 00:00:02,720 -- 00:00:03,800 that can happen in a water body, 00:00:03,800 -- 00:00:05,800 like a river or a lake, 00:00:05,920 -- 00:00:09,780 when too many nutrients are added to the system. 00:00:09,920 -- 00:00:12,420 Eutrophication starts with fertilisers, which are rich in 00:00:12,500 -- 00:00:14,500 nutrients like nitrate and phosphate, 00:00:14,500 -- 00:00:16,320 are washed into the river or lake system. 00:00:16,940 -- 00:00:19,920 This leads to an increase in nutrient concentrations in the water. 00:00:22,740 -- 00:00:24,740 The nutrients are food for algae. 00:00:25,040 -- 00:00:27,040 The algae grow and reproduce quickly, 00:00:27,220 -- 00:00:29,220 forming a thick green bloom in the water. 00:00:31,400 --00:00:34,640 This algal bloom will absorb sunlight shining on the water 00:00:35,040 -- 00:00:37,040 so the sunlight can't reach the bottom. 00:00:37,500 -- 00:00:40,160 Plants who need this light to photosynthesis will die. 00:00:41,180 -- 00:00:43,180 The algae will also start to die when 00:00:43,180 -- 00:00:44,340 they eat up all of the nutrients 00:00:44,340 -- 00:00:46,020 and run out of food. 00:00:46,740 -- 00:00:48,340 Next, 00:00:48,520 -- 00:00:51,520 bacteria start to breakdown the dead plants and algae. 00:00:51,520 -- 00:00:53,040 That releases more nutrients 00:00:53,040 -- 00:00:54,560 back into the water 00:00:54,560 -- 00:00:56,380 continuing the Algal Bloom Cycle. 00:00:59,800 -- 00:01:02,880 The bacteria, with a continuing supply of food, 00:01:03,280 -- 00:01:05,280 reproduce into much larger numbers 00:01:05,660 -- 00:01:08,180 consuming oxygen as they grow and respire. 00:01:09,380 -- 00:01:11,380 There is not much oxygen in the water to begin with 00:01:12,080 -- 00:01:14,080 so when the bacteria consume it quickly 00:01:14,080 -- 00:01:15,540 it might run out completely. 00:01:16,020 -- 00:01:19,040 Water without oxygen is called Anoxic. 00:01:19,320 -- 00:01:21,320 If the water turns anoxic 00:01:21,580 -- 00:01:23,860 all non-bacterial life in the water, 00:01:24,040 -- 00:01:27,800 including fish and other animals, will die. 00:01:28,560 -- 00:01:29,100 So, 00:01:29,660 -- 00:01:32,960 eutrophication happens when nutrients are added to water 00:01:32,960 -- 00:01:34,640 which causes an algal bloom, 00:01:34,860 -- 00:01:37,420 cutting off sunlight and feeding bacteria. 00:01:37,780 -- 00:01:39,780 The bacteria use up oxygen in the water 00:01:39,780 -- 00:01:41,300 which becomes an anoxic, 00:01:41,440 -- 00:01:43,780 causing everything living in the water to die. 00:01:44,520 -- 00:01:47,240 Eutrophication is one reason why we need to be careful 00:01:47,540 -- 00:01:49,540 with fertilisers when we are growing crops. This is part of our sciences pilot for the virtual school. We would appreciate any comments or feedback. Want to learn more? Visit: http://www.thevirtualschool.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/virtualschooluk Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/virtualschooluk Our channel: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are Quarks? | Physics | The Fuse School
 
03:18
Find out what quarks are, how they were discovered and why they are very important in relation to protons and neutrons. There are different types of quarks which you'll learn about in this GCSE / K12 "Radioactivity" video from the Virtual School. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Le Chatelier's Principle Part 1 | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:15
What exactly is Le Chatelier's Principle? And why is it important to learn it to understand chemical reactions? Find out in this video! Part 2 found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhQ02egUs5Y& At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are Emulsions? | Chemistry | The Fuse School
 
03:08
Learn all about emulsions, how they are made and where we can find them in everyday life. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Exact Trig Values - Hand Trick | Trigonometry | Maths | FuseSchool
 
04:08
There are some key angles that have exact values in trigonometry. The ones we need to know are 0, 30, 45, 60 and 90. In this video we will discover one method of remember what these values are - by counting fingers on our hand! In the first part we discovered a different method (constructing a table) which you may prefer. Choose whichever method works best for you. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is Electrolysis | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
05:11
Learn the basics about electrolysis. Electrolysis is electrical current flow through a liquid which causes chemical changes. The liquid can be a molten ionic compound or aqueous solution. The liquid will contain free-flowing positive ions and negative ions. The positive ions are called cations, and the negative ions are called anions. Electrodes are submerged in the liquid (electrolyte solution) and connected to an electrical cell. The electrons will start to flow in the wires and this will cause one electrode to become positively charged (the anode) and the other negatively charged (the cathode). This has an immediate knock-on effect in the molten liquid, and the ions in it. The positive ions in the liquid (electrolyte) are attracted to the negative electrode (cathode). The negative ions in the liquid (electrolyte), is going to be attracted to the positive electrode (anode). This is because opposite electrical charges attract. When the ions meet the electrodes, electron exchange happens and this triggers a chemical reaction. Remember that electrolysis can also take place in ionic solutions as well as molten compounds. The more concentrated the solution, the greater the ion flow rate. Ion flow rate can also be increased by increasing the potential difference or voltage across the cell. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is the Bronsted Lowry Theory | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:56
Have you ever head of the Bronsted Lowry Theory of acids and bases, an essential theory of Chemistry? It helps you fill the gaps in the Arrhenius theory. This education video by the Virtual School will teach you about: - Testing acids - Dissociation At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What is Dynamic Equilibrium? | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:19
Learn about dynamic equilibrium, the conditions required for dynamic equilibrium to be reached and examples of systems at equilibrium. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected]school.org Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are Ionic Bonds?  | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
02:55
In this video you'll learn the basics about Ionic Bonds. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Manufacturing Sulphuric Acid | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:31
Learn the basics about manufacturing sulphuric acid as part of the equilibrium topic within reactions. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Xylem and Phloem - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:28
Plants have a transport system to move things around. The xylem moves water and solutes, from the roots to the leaves in a process known as transpiration. The phloem moves glucose and amino acids from the leaves all around the plant, in a process known as translocation. The xylem and phloem are arranged in groups called vascular bundles. The arrangement is slightly different in the roots to the stems. The xylem are made up of dead cells, whereas the phloem is made up of living cells. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is the Haber Process | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:05
What is the Haber Process, how does it work and where do we use it? In this education video by The Fuse Universal you are going to learn about: - How to conduct the Haber Process - Industrial Process for the Production of Ammonia - Uses of the Haber Process in Industry At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
How to extract aluminium by electrolysis | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
03:14
Aluminium is the most abundant metal on Earth. However, it is expensive because a lot of electricity is used to extract it. Bauxite is the aluminium ore. It is purified to yield aluminium oxide, which is a white powder. Aluminium is then extracted from aluminium oxide by electrolysis. The aluminium oxide must be made molten so that the ions can pass through it during electrolysis. Aluminium oxide has a very high melting point - over 2000 degrees celsius. So instead of trying to melt it, the aluminium oxide is dissolved in molten cryolite. Cryolite is an aluminium compound with a much lower melting point than aluminium oxide, and so using this reduces some of the costs in extracting aluminium. The steel case is coated with graphite, providing the negative cathode. The positive anodes are immersed in the molten cryolite, and are also made of graphite. When the battery is turned on and electricity flows, the aluminium forms at the negative cathode and sinks to the bottom of the tank where is is tapped off as a pure liquid metal. Oxygen forms at the positive anodes. The oxygen reacts with the carbon of the graphite, forming carbon dioxide. The positive anode therefore burns away, and needs replacing regularly. This is another reason for the extraction of aluminium being so expensive. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Structure of the Leaf | Plant Biology | The Fuse School
 
03:43
Plants make food through photosynthesis. Using their leaves, plants combine sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to make glucose and oxygen. A leaf is like a plant's food factory, collecting all of the components into one place so that photosynthesis can happen. Let's start with sunlight. The top of a leaf is exposed to the most sunlight, and so the cells specialised for trapping light are on top of the leaf. These specialised cells are called palisade mesophyll cells. They are packed full of chlorophyll - the green chemical that plants used to absorb light. Most leaves have a large surface area so that they can trap as much sunlight as possible. Moving onto carbon dioxide. This is where the bottom of the leaf comes in. There are little pores on the bottom of the leaf called stomata. The stomata open up so that carbon dioxide can diffuse into the leaf. The stomata are controlled by 'sausage shaped' guard cells, which open up to let carbon dioxide in. The guard cells can also close the stomata, to stop other things inside the leaf, like water, from escaping. The carbon dioxide comes in from the stomata, and then makes its way up through the leaf, through the gaps in the spongy mesophyll layer in the bottom part of the leaf and heads up to the palisade cells where photosynthesis occurs. Leaves are thin so that the carbon dioxide doesn't have too far to travel. The final reactant needed for photosynthesis is water. Water comes into the plant through the roots, moves up the stem and enters the leaf through the vascular bundle. The vascular bundle contains a hollow tube specifically for water movement called the xylem. The veins on a leaf are actually the vascular bundle, allowing water to be spread out through the leaf. The leaves palisade cells now have sunlight, carbon dioxide and water. They are ready to photosynthesis to make glucose and oxygen. How do leaves manage to let in the wanted things (like water and carbon dioxide) but prevent unwanted things like bacteria getting in and also prevent the reactants from escaping before being used? At the top and bottom of the leaf are epidermis cells. These produce a protective waxy cuticle layer. The waxy cuticle seals up the leaf so that the only way in and out are through the stomata, which are regulated by the guard cells. So from top to bottom, a leaf's structure: - Waxy cuticle and epidermis cells - Palisade cells (where photosynthesis occurs) - Spongy mesophyll (with vascular bundle running through for water transport) - Epidermis and cuticle, with stomata and guard cells spread throughout (allowing carbon dioxide in). At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Transport in Cells: Active Transport | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:32
In the first part of this video we looked at diffusion to move gases and osmosis for the movement of water, from high concentration to low concentration down their concentration gradient. Active transport works in the opposite direction; it moves molecules from a low concentration to a high concentration, against the concentration gradient. This is the opposite of diffusion and osmosis. And because it is not the natural direction, energy from is required to make this work. Active transport is carried out by protein carriers. The protein carriers are within the cell membrane and they have a specific binding site for the exact molecule they are transporting. The substance binds to the protein carrier on the side that it is at low concentration. And using energy from respiration, the protein carrier releases the substance on the other side of the membrane - where it is already at a higher concentration. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Fractional Distillation | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:06
In this video learn how fractional distillation separates crude oil into useful fractions, examples of these fractions and where they're used in everyday life. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What are metallic bonds? | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:14
Learn the basics about particles in a metal, that are held together by metallic bonds.What are metallic bonds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Hydrocarbon Cracking and Why It Is Done | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
03:50
Learn the basics about the cracking of hydrocarbons and why it is done. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
The functional group concept explained | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:51
This is the introduction to the Functional Group concept - giving an oversight about Organic Chemistry, the composition of Alkenes. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What Is Plasma | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about plasma - the fourth state of matter, when learning about properties of matter. When ice is sufficiently heated, it melts to form water. It has therefore undergone a change of state – from a solid to a liquid. Recall that in a solid, all of the particles are closely packed in a fixed position, and therefore has a fixed shape and volume. The particles in a liquid are still touching one another and are able to move around one another, therefore, a liquid still has a fixed volume but takes the shape of their container. Water evaporates from a liquid to a gas. The particles in a gas are further away from one another and take the shape and volume of their container. For certain substances, if we continue to apply heat to their gaseous form, another change of state could occur. These substances can go from a gas to a state of matter called plasma. For this change of state to occur, very strong heat must be applied. When heat is sufficiently strong, the electrons are stripped from their respective atoms, creating free electrons and positive ions. Although there are both negative and positive particles, overall, plasma is neutral as there are equal amounts of oppositely charged particles. Because there are free electrons, substances in a plasma form can conduct electricity. This is what separates a gas from plasma – gases cannot conduct electricity, but plasma can. Naturally occurring plasma include lightning and the Northern lights. Stars also exist in plasma form – in fact stars are just really hot balls of plasma. Plasma can be found in fluorescent light bulbs and neon signs. When an electrical current is passed through the mercury vapour in fluorescent light bulbs and certain noble gases in neon signs, it heats up the gases sufficiently to strip the electrons and create plasma. The technology actually goes even further beyond light bulbs and neon signs. Plasma screen TVs are made possible due to this state of matter. A plasma screen is made of many thousands of tiny dots called pixels, which are made of three fluorescent light electrodes, emitting the colours red, green, and blue. The combination of these colours can give any possible colour, which is why we can see all colours on these screens. The higher the number of pixels, the higher the definition, and the images will appear “sharper” and more detailed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Limestone Cycle - limestone, quicklime and slaked lime | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about limestone cycle - limestone, quicklime and slaked lime. What are their properties, similarities and differences? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Electrolysis of Brine | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the electrolysis of brine within the overall reactions topic. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Xylem and Phloem - Part 3 - Translocation - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Sugars move up and down the plant in the phloem. The phloem uses active transport to transport the food nutrients like glucose and amino acids around the plant. Glucose is made in the leaves by photosynthesis. Glucose is converted into sucrose in the leaves, which then enters the phloem vessels, as do amino acids. They then need to be transported around the plant to every single cell. The areas of the plant where sucrose is made are called the sources, and where they are delivered are called sinks. The phloem uses active transport because the sucrose moves against its concentration gradient from a lower concentration, where it is made, to a higher concentration in the phloem cells. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What are catalysts? | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Catalysts. What are catalysts? How do catalysts work? Using catalysts in industry? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
What are Radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about radioactive isotopes? how they are created? and what chemical reactions are created? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Le Chatelier's Principle: Part 2  | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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What exactly is Le Chatelier's Principle? And why is it important to learn it to understand chemical reactions? Find out in this video! Find part 1, the other video on Le Chatelier's principle here: http://youtu.be/7zuUV455zFs At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Alkanes and Alkenes | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics of alkanes and alkenes. After watching the covalent bonds video you should have sufficient knowledge to understand about how alkanes and alkenes are formed and the differences between them. SUBSCRIBE to our channel to access many more educational videos. At The Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! This video is part of the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Enzymes | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Enzymes are really important proteins, that speed up the rates of reactions such as in photosynthesis, respiration and protein synthesis. The enzymes and substrates are always moving, and occasionally they collide at the right speed and orientation so that the substrate fits into the enzyme at the active site. Collision theory dictates that collisions must occur with sufficient energy and in a specific orientation for a reaction to occur. Enzymes are specialised; their active site matches the shape of the specific substrate that they react with. The enzyme and the substrate fit together using a lock and key mechanism. Once the substrate is in the active site, the reaction takes place. The required product is produced and the enzyme releases itself and carries on moving around. The enzyme could be protease, which breaks down proteins into amino acids. Or carbohydrase which breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. Or lipase which breaks down fats into fatty acids and glycerols. Hydrogen peroxide is often formed as a result of reactions in cells, and if it is left to build up it is harmful. Luckily, we have catalase enzymes that are really fast. They break the hydrogen peroxide down into the harmless water and oxygen. Equally, enzymes can help build up molecules like this… but the process is still exactly the same. Whilst enzymes do fantastic things, they are sensitive. Each enzyme has optimum conditions under which it works best. Firstly, there needs to be enough substrate around - they need a high enough substrate concentration for the reaction that they catalyse. If there is too little substrate, then the rate of reaction is slowed. Sometimes, if there is too much product around then the reaction slows because the enzymes and substrates have less chance of bumping into each other. So the product needs to be removed for a higher rate of reaction. Enzymes also have optimum pH and temperature conditions. Up to a point, an increase in temperature causes increased rate of reaction because there is more heat energy. More energy means more collisions. However, above a certain temperature the rate drops off due to denaturing. We will look at the effect of pH and temperature on enzymes in our video ‘Denaturation of Enzymes’. The pH and temperature optimum conditions are specific to the conditions in which they work in; an enzyme that works in the stomach for example would have a more acidic optimum pH. And of course, there need to be enough enzymes around for the rate of reaction to be optimised. So we know that enzymes and substrates fit together at the active site and form a ‘lock and key’ mechanism. The enzyme then releases the product and can be reused again. They are sensitive to temperature and pH, and there needs to be sufficient enzyme and substrate concentrations for reactions to occur. Enzymes not only control all kinds of reactions such as in photosynthesis, respiration, digestion and protein synthesis, but we also make use of them in day to day life. Protease and lipase enzymes are used in biological washing powders to remove proteins and fats from stains in our clothes. We also use enzymes in our food and drink industries; pectinase is used to break down the cells in fruit when making fruit juice so that more juice is released. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What are Isotopes? | Chemistry | FuseSchool
 
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What are Isotopes? Find out in this video from the Properties of Matter chapter. 00:00:02,590 -- 00:00:07,319 In a previous video we learnt about Isotopes. Here are a few more examples. 00:00:07,319 -- 00:00:14,319 There are two isotopic forms of Chlorine: Chlorine 35 and Chlorine 37. Remember isotopes 00:00:16,910 -- 00:00:21,869 have the SAME number of protons, but a different number of neutrons. So how 00:00:21,869 -- 00:00:27,090 many neutrons are in each of these isotopic forms of Chlorine? 00:00:27,090 -- 00:00:30,980 Remember: Mass Number = Number of Protons + Number of 00:00:30,980 -- 00:00:34,030 Neutrons. And the number of protons for each isotope forms 00:00:34,030 -- 00:00:39,960 of elements is the same, so we can rearrange this formula to calculate the number of neutrons 00:00:39,960 -- 00:00:44,969 in each form. Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons 00:00:44,969 -- 00:00:51,969 When we look at Chlorine on the periodic table it has an atomic number of 17, therefore it 00:00:55,149 -- 00:00:59,860 has 17 protons. So Chlorine-35 has a mass of 35. 00:00:59,860 -- 00:01:04,480 Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons = 35 -17 00:01:04,480 -- 00:01:06,909 = 18 18 neutrons 00:01:06,909 -- 00:01:13,909 So Chlorine-37 has a mass of 37. Neutrons = Mass Number - Protons 00:01:15,360 -- 00:01:18,929 = 37 -17 = 20 00:01:18,929 -- 00:01:24,590 20 neutrons. So Chlorine-35 has 18 neutrons and Chlorine 00:01:24,590 -- 00:01:25,999 37 has 20 neutrons. 00:01:25,999 -- 00:01:32,999 Another example of an isotope is Lithium. Lithium has two stable isotopic forms. 00:01:33,340 -- 00:01:38,619 The atomic number of Lithium is 3, therefore it has 3 protons. 00:01:38,619 -- 00:01:43,450 The isotopes of Lithium have 3 neutrons and 4 neutrons respectively. 00:01:43,450 -- 00:01:48,729 How do we calculate each of the isotopes mass number? 00:01:48,729 -- 00:01:52,349 Remember, Mass Number = Number of Protons + Number of 00:01:52,349 -- 00:01:56,209 Neutrons. So for one isotopic form the mass number would 00:01:56,209 -- 00:02:00,059 be: 3 + 3 = 6 00:02:00,059 -- 00:02:04,489 So we would have Li-6 And for the other form, the mass number would 00:02:04,489 -- 00:02:05,599 be 3+4 = 7 00:02:05,599 -- 00:02:09,580 So we would have Li- 7 Want to learn more? Visit: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Transport in Cells: Diffusion and Osmosis | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we are going to discover how cells take in useful substances and remove waste using three methods of transportation: diffusion, osmosis and then in the second part we will look at active transport. The exchange of materials occurs between cells and their environment, across the cell membrane. To make this exchange as efficient as possible, some organisms have evolved specialised exchange surfaces like the alveoli in the lungs, or root hairs in plants or the nephrons in kidneys. Depending upon what is being exchanged and which direction along the concentration gradient things are travelling will determine whether diffusion, osmosis or active transport will be used. Diffusion is the process in which particles spread out from each other. They move from high concentration to an area of low concentration,down the concentration gradient until they are evenly distributed. Osmosis is very similar to diffusion but just for water. It is the movement of water into or out of a cell. Again, it is the movement from a dilute solution (so high concentration of water molecules) down the concentration gradient to a more concentrated solution - so low concentration of water molecules. The water molecules move across a partially permeable membrane. Watch part 2 to learn about active transport. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]ool.org
Protein Synthesis | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Proteins are made of a long chain of amino acids, which has been coded for by DNA. The order of the bases of DNA determines which protein is made, by coding for a specific order of amino acids. This is protein synthesis, and in this video we are going to look at how it works. You may want to watch our ‘what is DNA’ video first to remind yourself all about DNA. A set of three bases in the DNA molecule codes for a particular amino acid. GGT for example codes for the amino acid called Glycine. The 3 base codes are known as codons. So GGT is a “codon” for Glycine. There are 20 amino acids that make up our body’s proteins. 9 of these we need to take in through our diet as our body cannot manufacture them. These are known as essential amino acids. Our body can however manufacture non-essential amino acids. Whilst 20 amino acids build proteins, there are actually many others that do not form proteins, possibly over 250. They may form sugar for example. Before we start, you need to know what RNA is - so you may want to watch our ‘what is RNA’ video first. The DNA is in the nucleus and cannot move, but the ribosomes in the cytoplasm are where the proteins are made. This means the code from the DNA needs to be copied and carried across to the ribosome by a molecule called messenger RNA or mRNA before the protein can be made. Let’s have a look at how this all works. In the nucleus, the enzyme RNA polymerase unwinds and unzips the two strands of DNA that contain the protein-making gene. Only one of these strands is going to be replicated. Complementary RNA nucleotides base pair with the chosen strand. RNA polymerase also binds the RNA nucleotides together making a new RNA strand. This is the messenger RNA or mRNA. This process inside the nucleus is called transcription. The mRNA travels from the cell nucleus and out into the cytoplasm, until it reaches and attaches to a ribosome. The ribosome then sticks amino acids together to make a polypeptide chain, following the order of amino acids as coded by the mRNA. Three base codons on the mRNA code for one amino acid. This process is called translation. Let’s look at translation in a little more detail - what is actually happening inside the ribosome... Transfer RNA or tRNA molecules, carrying specific amino acids, base pair with the mRNA inside the ribosome. So the tRNA brings in the amino acids and the mRNA provides the information of the exact order that the amino acids need to be bonded together in, to ensure the correct protein is made. As more tRNAs match up with the mRNA, the amino acid chain becomes longer. Eventually the polypeptide chain will form into the protein. So there we have protein synthesis. Inside the nucleus, the DNA molecule is unzipped from around the gene by DNA polymerase. The DNA is replicated and mRNA is formed in the process of transcription. The mRNA travels out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm, where it binds with a ribosome. In the ribosome, the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA is translated by tRNA molecules which carry related amino acids. The polypeptide chain is formed, and will eventually fold into the required protein. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Corrosion of Metals | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
02:53
Learn the basics about the corrosion of metals. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Xylem and Phloem - Part 2 - Transpiration - Transport in Plants | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Transpiration is the evaporation of water from the aerial parts of a plant (so the leaves and stems). By water evaporating out of these parts - mostly the leaves, a suction pressure is created which draws water up through the plant. This is called the transpiration pull. Water passes in from the soil by osmosis, passing down the concentration gradient, and into the root hair cell’s cytoplasm, and then on to the xylem vessels. Water moves through the xylem vessels from the root to the stem to the leaf. As well as the leaf cells needing water for photosynthesis, water also keeps the cells turgid which supports the plant. Inside the leaves, water is drawn out of the xylem cells to replace the water lost through transpiration. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Electrolysis of Molten Compounds | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:04
Learn the basics about Electrolysis of Molten Compounds. What is electrolysis? What are molten compounds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
What are endothermic and exothermic reactions | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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An exothermic reaction gives off energy to the surroundings; like a fire giving off heat. An endothermic reaction takes in energy from the surroundings; like a snowman melting. Exothermic reactions transfer energy to the surroundings, and this energy is usually heat energy, they cause the surroundings to heat up. Just like a bonfire keeping everyone warm. As well as combustion (burning), other examples of exothermic reactions are: - Neutralisation reactions between acids and alkalis - The reaction between water and calcium oxide - Respiration. It is easy to detect an exothermic reaction - just get your thermometer and see if the temperature increases. Most chemical reactions are exothermic, because heat is given out. Physical processes can also be endothermic or exothermic. When something freezes, it goes from liquid to solid. Bonds need to be made for this to happen, and to make bonds you need to do some work, thus energy is given out and freezing is exothermic. Similarly, when condensation happens - because a gas is going to liquid, again bonds need to be made and so energy is given out. So freezing and condensation are exothermic. Because in exothermic reactions, energy is given out to the surroundings. This means that the energy of the reactants is higher than the energy of the products. Endothermic reactions are less common. They take in energy from the surroundings. The energy being transferred is usually heat. So in endothermic reactions, the surroundings usually get colder. Some examples of endothermic reactions are: - Electrolysis - The reaction between sodium carbonate and ethanoic acid - Photosynthesis. Endothermic reactions can also be seen in physical processes. When something melts it goes from a solid to a liquid. For this to happen, bonds need to be broken. And to break bonds, energy needs to be put in. Boiling is also endothermic because energy needs to be put in to break the bonds for the liquid to turn to gas. Because in endothermic reactions, energy is added to the reaction, the energy of the products is higher than the energy of the reactants. And again, we can detect endothermic reactions with a thermometer because the temperature would get colder. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Crude Oil Fractions and their uses | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about the uses of crude oil fractions. Before watching this video you should watch our video explaining how crude oil is separated into it's different length hydrocarbon fractions by utilising the different boiling points of each hydrocarbon fraction. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
The Lymphatic System | Biology for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about The Lymphatic System. This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Group 7 - The Halogens | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Halogens, their properties and uses. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
What is Nuclear Fission? | Physics | The Fuse School
 
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How does a nuclear reactor provide energy? What causes a nuclear meltdown? And how do we make this safe? All of these questions are answered in this 'Radioactivity' video from The Fuse School GCSE / K12. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Mitosis - Stages of Mitosis | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we are will look at mitosis, including the names of the key stages: interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase and cytokinesis. Mitosis is the process of cell division that produces identical copies of cells, and is involved in growth, cell repair and asexual reproduction. When cells divide by mitosis, the number of cells increases, and hence the organism grows. Different organisms have different numbers of chromosomes. A chromosome is made up of two chromatids; one from the mother and one from the father. During interphase, the chromosomes duplicate and become two identical chromatids, joined at the centromere. So in humans, it has gone from the normal 46 to 92. During prophase, the chromosomes condense in the nucleus, and the spindle fibres form in the cytoplasm. During metaphase the nuclear membrane breaks apart, the spindle fibres attach to the chromosomes and the chromosomes line up at the equator of the cell. In anaphase, the spindle fibres shorten and the centromere divides, so that each chromosome becomes two separate chromatids. During telophase the nuclear membrane forms around each set of chromosomes. The chromosomes spread back out in their ‘new’ nucleus and the spindle fibres break down. In humans, each nucleus has the normal ‘46’ chromosomes again. The final stage is cytokinesis. The cell membrane pinches in to separate the two sets of chromatids into two identical daughter cells, with the same number of chromosomes as the parent - so 46 (or 23 pairs) in humans. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is RNA | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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DNA is a type of nucleic acid. And in this video we are going to have a quick look at another type; RNA. We have both DNA and RNA in our bodies. We need them both! DNA is the blueprint; it contains all of the instructions for the cell to grow, function and replicate. The RNA carries out these instructions; it copies and transfers the genetic code from the DNA to ensure the relevant proteins are made. So just think of it as “DNA makes RNA make proteins”. Whereas DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, RNA stands for ribonucleic acid. Whilst DNA is double stranded, RNA is single stranded. Like DNA, RNA is made up of a long chain of nucleotides. Each nucleotide consists of a ribose sugar, phosphate group and a nucleotide base. RNA has a sugar called ribose, whereas DNA has a sugar called deoxyribose. RNA has a base uracil, or U, whereas DNA has the base thymine or T. So in RNA C and G still pair, but now A and U pair. We need to know about RNA because we will see it when learning about protein synthesis. We will see two special types of RNA: messenger RNA which is known as mRNA. And transfer RNA which is known as tRNA. We will see the mRNA being synthesised inside the nucleus, copied from the DNA code. The tRNA is found in the cytoplasm. For many years, we just thought RNA was a DNA photocopier as mRNA, the protein builder as tRNA and found in ribosomes as rRNA. However, RNA can also act as enzymes to speed up chemical reactions. And in many viruses, they have RNA instead of DNA. The RNA carries the genetic code in these viruses. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What are Ions | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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What is an ion? What role does it have to play in the structure of atoms? Find out in this Chemistry Journey video by The Fuse School. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Extraction of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air. How do you extract oxygen? What are nitogren's properties? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Group 1 - the Alkali Metals | The Periodic Table | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
04:20
A great summary about Group 1 in the Periodic table - The Alkali Metals. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Purifying copper | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
04:32
Learn the basics about Purifying copper. What methods and techniques are used in purifying copper? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
How Does Electroplating Work | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
05:49
Learn the basics about electroplating. The anode is positively charged, and the cathode is negatively charged. They are immersed in a solution called an electrolyte. The electrolyte and the anode are selected based upon the material that you are electroplating with. So if you want to create a copper plate on the cathode, you would use a copper anode and a copper based electrolyte solution. When the battery is turned on, the positively charged ions in the electrolyte are attracted to the cathode. Here, they gain electrons which is known as reduction. When the battery is turned on, the negatively charged ions in the electrolyte solution are attracted to the anode. The atoms within the anode, so the copper atoms in copper plating, lose electrons which is known as oxidation. These copper atoms are now positively charged and dissolve into the electrolyte solution. Once in the electrolyte solution, because they are now positively charged they are attracted over to the negative cathode. Hence electroplating the cathode. The electrons flow from the anode to the cathode. Half equations occur at each anode, with oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. Just remember, oxidation is loss of electrons and reduction is gain. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is Brownian motion? | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
02:36
What exactly is Brownian Motion? Learn it all on this video! At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Wave motion | Waves | Physics | FuseSchool
 
03:39
All waves can transfer energy from one place to another without transferring any matter. This is done by a series of disturbances or vibrations that carry the energy. Just like the people in their seats, only moving up and down when it’s their turn. Waves can transfer energy through solids, liquids, gases and empty spaces – otherwise known as vacuums. There are two types of waves – which we will look at in more detail in another video, but the basic features are the same. The frequency of a wave is the number of complete waves passing a fixed point in a given amount of time. This time period is usually one second. Frequency is given the symbol f and is measured in units called Hertz. Hertz measure how many complete cycles per second; so how many people in our Mexican wave stand up every second. The frequency and period are often confused. The frequency refers to how often something happens, whereas the period refers to the time it takes to happen. The period of a wave is the time for one complete cycle. So the time taken for one person to stand up, wave and sit down. This would be measured in seconds. When something happens repeatedly we say that the event is periodic and refer to the time for the event to repeat itself. The period of the earth to orbit the sun is 365 days, the period of a day is 24 hours, the period of a typical class at school is 45 minutes. Now for the wavelength… the wavelength is the distance between a point on one wave and the same point on the next wave, for example two peaks or two troughs. Wavelength is given the symbol Lambda from the Greek letter, and is usually measured in metres. Wavelengths can vary hugely in size, x-rays are very short, visible light is here and FM radiowaves are much longer. So we’ve looked at the frequency, period and wavelength so far. Let’s finish with amplitude. As waves travel, they create disturbance. The amplitude of a wave is the distance from the maximum disturbance to its undisturbed position. Think of a very flat sea… and then an incoming wave. The amplitude is the height of the top of the wave from the flat sea. In another video we’ll be looking at the wave speed equation, and connecting wavelengths and frequencies: Wave Equation For now you just need to know what these 4 keys words mean. Frequency, period, wavelength, amplitude SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What is Alpha Radiation? | Radioactivity | The Fuse School
 
03:36
What is alpha radiation? How does it happen? And what does it leave behind? Find out all the answers in this GCSE / K12 Physics video from The Fuse School At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Mole Day Music Video: Molar Eclipse of the Heart (Parody Song)
 
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Learn about Avogadro's number, the mole, in this music video to the tune of Bonnie Tyler's 'Total Eclipse of the Heart'. This is just a fun video that gives you an introduction to the Mole as it is used in Chemistry - but you can find so many more videos on http://www.youtube.com/virtualschool - have fun learning Sung by: Alex Watson of 'Bastedo': http://itsbastedo.com/ Produced by: M3NSA http://m3nsa.com/ This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND Sky footage from NatureClip, 2011 Background music from Bonnie Tyler, Total Eclipse of the Heart Lyrics: Underground, moles are little animals with really weird noses who like to dig around Round and brown, every here and there you'll find a hairy brown spot on your skin, we also call that a mole! Search around, moles are spies who work in private espionage, they spy in secret, and they don't make a sound Also found, Everywhere in mexico Mole is a spicy sauce Same spelling but a whole different sound! Turnaround blind eyes Don't you know it's more than you can tell Turnaround blind eyes, moles can also mean something else 'Cos in chemistry a mole. Is a unit used to measure, The atoms or molecules, In a substance of whatever! It's the number of carbon twelve atoms In twelve grams of carbon... Matter's filled with way too many atoms to count, So use Avagadro's number to express the amount! For any type of matter: solid, liquid or gas, The grams within a mole will equal atomic mass. All you need is a mole! Six-oh-two sextillion! Six-oh-two sextillion! Six point oh two two, one four oh seven eight, Times 10 to power of twenty three That number's a mole We use it in chemistry. Once upon a time Avagadro said hey! And showed us the way out of the dark, His number you must use, A molar eclipse of the heart. A molar eclipse of the heart. Get in touch: [email protected] Find out more: http://www.thevirtualschool.com Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/virtualschooluk 'Fuse School', the global education initiative created by leading Social Learning organisation 'Fuse Universal'. We are on a mission to provide great education to millions of learners who need it most - so that they can improve their lives and communities. Our specialist teachers & talened animators from accross the globe co-create a complete library of secondary education videos for students and teachers alike - in the Sciences, Maths, EFL and ICT. All of this is free to the world as Open Educational Resources under a Creative Commons License. Starting in November 2013, these resources will not only be available on YouTube EDU, but also on our Open Platform 'Fuse School'. Visit www.FuseSchool.com for a free, personalised learning & teaching experience. Wherevery you are in the world: If your fire burns for education as a human right email us at [email protected] and join our OER movement of teachers, NGOs, charities, unis & edtech companies!